Moved topic: Singlehanded sailing with an HR29

Any comments, questions, stories about HR 29, this is the right place.
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Re: Moved topic: Singlehanded sailing with an HR29

Postby Chris » Wed Feb 12, 2014 7:56 pm

Yes there is a lot of rope but I'm not sure there's enough room in the boom for the shuttle block plus the mainsail outhaul block. Plus the illustration is only showing one reef. Mmmm… have to look at this one next time I'm at the boat.

By the way Martijn, I saw on your rudder topic you were curious as to software I use. Yes it's Photoshop which comes in handy for such things from time to time. As they say "A picture paints a thousand words" And by the way Martijn your deck is gorgeous, I am well jealous and I bet a few other members also.

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Re: Moved topic: Singlehanded sailing with an HR29

Postby Antti_DD » Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:56 pm

Speaking of the single line reefing, I guess that Tom mentioned earlier that in HR29 one cannot fit the Selden's system inside the original boom, so one needs to buy a new boom as well.

I think, that the two line reefing system, which Chris mentioned, could be pretty good and reliable option. However, I guess that the only drawback is that the system leads easily to cockpit spagetti and there is also a need to install more rope clutches.
Antti Laine, Forum Administrator
HR 29 # 483 "Dolphin Dance"
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Re: Moved topic: Singlehanded sailing with an HR29

Postby tomblix » Wed Mar 12, 2014 7:27 pm

Hi guys

Anti - with regard to the possible increased friction with a single line reefing boom, I think I would much rather have that than to be "running around on the boat" in foul weather. Our mainsail isn`t really that big and hoisting and lowering is not very hard compared to bigger boats. I`ve sailed a 40-footer, and her sail was really heavy and hard to handle (stiff…). One good thing with the original arrangement is that we can choose not to set the reefs (tie the reef lines to the leech of the sail), or maybe just set one, especially if we`re out for an afternoon coffee trip…. I`m actually not sure how this will work on the new boom. Could be its more complicated to undo the reefs? I will know in two weeks!
Best regards from Tom

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Re: Moved topic: Singlehanded sailing with an HR29

Postby Dan » Tue Jun 10, 2014 7:46 am

I have arranged so that I can reef from the cockpit in the following way.
First I installed a plate under the tabernacle that allows you to attache shackles and blocks as the need occurs. (In another post I will show how i use it for the cunningham).
Step plate.jpg
Step plate.jpg (29.58 KiB) Viewed 1852 times
I then decided that there was no need to have the fore sail halyard in the cock pit since I have a furling system and the fore sail rarely needs to come down.
The beginning of the reef line is fed through the gooseneck and stop knotted.
IMG_2443.jpg
IMG_2443.jpg (31.2 KiB) Viewed 1852 times
It is then fed through a block at the reefing point and then returned to a block on the plate.
IMG_2441.jpg
IMG_2441.jpg (24.34 KiB) Viewed 1852 times
IMG_2442.jpg
IMG_2442.jpg (29.8 KiB) Viewed 1852 times

It is further led to the cockpit.
IMG_2435.jpg
IMG_2435.jpg (25.07 KiB) Viewed 1852 times

The white rope, (Reef 2) is the leach reef that exits at the gooseneck and has been led through another block on the plate and then to the cockpit rope clutch. (Dirk = Topping lift).
(On the starboard side rope clutch I control the main halyard, the rod kick and the spinnaker pole lift).

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Re: Moved topic: Singlehanded sailing with an HR29

Postby Mallemuk » Thu Jun 12, 2014 8:27 pm

Hi

I have recently bougth my HR 29 and luckily the previous owner fitted the boat with a Selden furling mast two years ago - together with a new teak deck. The main sail furls inside the mast and together with the furling genoa it makes it very easy to manage the boat singlehanded. Being able to operate the sails from the cockpit also improves safety considerable.

Last year a good friend of mine, Christian Liebergreen, compleeted a singlehanded sea voyage non stop around the world trip in his Sagitta 35. If you are interessede in the subject single handed sailing you can visit his Web page www.jonnadenmark.dk.

Kind regards,
John

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Re: Moved topic: Singlehanded sailing with an HR29

Postby milsten » Sun Dec 31, 2017 12:46 pm

Dan

I need some extra blocks on the mastfoot, so the installation of a step plate, as shown in your picture, seems to be a good solution. I suppose it's from Selden, but do you have any reference number. Did you install it yourself ? How are the bolts from the mastfoot fixed into the deck ? Are there any nuts ?

Best regards and Happy New Year

Werner

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Re: Moved topic: Singlehanded sailing with an HR29

Postby Hugh.Price » Mon May 07, 2018 12:15 pm

I'd be interested to know how other owners manage with mooring ropes when coming into a pontoon single handed.

Haven't tried it yet, but am inclined to put a mooring rope with loop on through centre cleat on deck then lead back and a couple of turns around the jib winch on that side, so that when the mooring rope takes up the load there is not a sudden jar which could cause damage.

Problem is of course getting that loop around a cleat on the pontoon and suppose it's est to fit a loop of plastic around the rope, the loop being held in place by a bowline.

Then when boat is stationary, perhaps keep forward power going at low revs and turn the bow gently away from the pontoon, so that the stern closes against the pontoon for getting off to secure other mooring ropes on bow and stern which have been made ready.

Does that make sense ?

Hugh Price
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Whitehaven Marina

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Re: Moved topic: Singlehanded sailing with an HR29

Postby Chris » Sat May 12, 2018 6:06 am

Hi Hugh,

When you say ‘coming into to a pontoon’ do you mean along side or into a finger berth with a dock pontoon ahead of you?

If the latter, which is typical of most marina berths, I have a dock fender on the pontoon at the bow and fenders along side on the boat. I then drive into the berth and keeping gentle power on, nudge the bow onto the bow fender and hold it there. Then (port side to) lash the helm hard to port and leave the power on and the boat will, as you say close and hold to the pontoon, while I attend to the dock lines. Then you can set the spring length out after taking power off.

In a strong wind situation, blowing you away from the pontoon this can become a little more difficult and you have to be a little more brave with the power. Be careful not to bounce off the fender and let the wind take the bow.

If along side, I put some long lines over the guard wires and under to cleats at the bow amidships and stern. Pontoon cleats can vary so I don’t bother about loops as things can get complicated and often there is no time to faff about.

I leave the lines uncoiled, but tidy on the deck amidships with a little draped over the guard wires where I can grab them as I approach.

The trick I find is to feel the boat’s way and let it settle itself best it can with power off and then step off with a few coils of the three lines in your hands, or at least two, fore and aft and get a turn on something. Obviously the latter is alongside in a visiting situation where there are no lines on the pontoon.

Wind can change everything and then you have to become a little more creative. Many examples have been featured in the yachting mags but unfortunately they never take into account that there are people that actually sail single-handed.

As long as you can get two lines ashore you should be ok to make fast. Then you can attend to the detail. The 29 isn’t a huge boat and I find I can manage her quite easily even in boisterous conditions.

Hope this is of some use,

Cheers

Chris

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